Collie: Nelson’s Encyclopaedia

Collie, The Scotch. The Scotch collie perhaps enjoys more favor than any other dog. His intelligence is only realized when one sees a well-trained collie collecting sheep, detecting and expelling strangers, and, finally, folding the flock. He exhibits the same intelligence in his amusements, and combines with it an affection and an exuberance of spirits that compel sympathy. The assertion, sometimes made, that the collie is treacherous, has no foundation in fact. Originally the colors were confined to tan, black and white, but sable and sable and white have become more popular of recent years. Points: Head long; skull not too wide or too round; muzzle fine, tapering and of fair length; eyes dark, expressive, and set obliquely; ears small, set rather far oack, and high—when excited ears semi- erect, with points hanging down and forwards: mask of face smooth; a well-knit, active, and sinewy frame; chest deep, but not wide; hind quarters drooping slightly; fore legs straight; hocks well bent; feet compart and strong: coat (in the rough variety), a dense furry undercoat, with a coat of hard, straight, rather stiff hair over; ruff and. frill very full; a little feather on fore legs, but none on the hind ones below the hocks: brush long, with an upward swirl at the end, but normally carried low; colors various. In the smooth variety a merle or marbled color is often much fancied. Average height for dogs, 23 in.; for bitches, 21 in. See R. Lee, The Collie or Sheepdog (1890).
excerpted from: Nelson’s Encyclopaedia: Everybody’s Book of Reference Volume 3
by Frank Moore Colby, George Sandeman
1907

Collie, The Scotch. The Scotch collie perhaps enjoys more favor than any other dog. His intelligence is only realized when one sees a well-trained collie collecting sheep, detecting and expelling strangers, and, finally, folding the flock. He exhibits the same intelligence in his amusements, and combines with it an affection and an exuberance of spirits that compel sympathy. The assertion, sometimes made, that the collie is treacherous, has no foundation in fact. Originally the colors were confined to tan, black and white, but sable and sable and white have become more popular of recent years. Points: Head long; skull not too wide or too round; muzzle fine, tapering and of fair length; eyes dark, expressive, and set obliquely; ears small, set rather far back, and high—when excited ears semi- erect, with points hanging down and forwards: mask of face smooth; a well-knit, active, and sinewy frame; chest deep, but not wide; hind quarters drooping slightly; fore legs straight; hocks well bent; feet compart and strong: coat (in the rough variety), a dense furry undercoat, with a coat of hard, straight, rather stiff hair over; ruff and. frill very full; a little feather on fore legs, but none on the hind ones below the hocks: brush long, with an upward swirl at the end, but normally carried low; colors various. In the smooth variety a merle or marbled color is often much fancied. Average height for dogs, 23 in.; for bitches, 21 in. See R. Lee, The Collie or Sheepdog (1890).

excerpted from: Nelson’s Encyclopaedia: Everybody’s Book of Reference Volume 3
by Frank Moore Colby, George Sandeman
1907

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